Monthly Archives: June 2015

What Was I Thinking? Maybe I Should Quit Writing

Let’s face it–we all have them. Days where nothing goes right. Nobody enjoys them, but if you’re a writer, you’re particularly vulnerable to them. Writers need critiques to write their best. Sometimes, everyone needs some outside eyes on their work.

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Writing

Author Interview with Katharine Tree

Katharine Tree is the author of the Settlement series: The Thin Line, Dark and Deep, Promises to Keep, and Before I Sleep, as well as her latest book, The Bear’s Wife. Katharine’s stories combine elements of romance, adventure, folklore, homesteading, survivalism and going

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Author Interviews

Three Act Structure–Epilogue

I hope the preceding posts were helpful in understanding the three act structure. And because you’ve hung with me this long, dear readers (I’ve always wanted to say that), I have some useful links for you. I would like to

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Writing

It’s Time to Get Rid of Hate Crimes and Their Symbols

Churches should not burn. And a determined teacher should not be arrested for removing a symbol of racism. This week, six mostly black congregations have seen their church homes go up in flames, at least three of them as a

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Three Act Structure–Third Act

Act three is where your protagonist either succeeds or fails utterly. It should comprise around the last 25% of your book. Right after the second plot point, the dark night of the soul, your protagonist has to devise a new

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Writing

Three Act Structure–Act Two

Act two is the middle of your story–the largest part, at least 50%. The best description of the second act I’ve ever heard came from one of Brandon Sanderson’s teaching videos on YouTube, which I highly recommend. He said that

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Writing

Three Act Structure–Act One: The Point of No Return

You’ve written your hook, messed up your character’s life with the inciting incident, and now it’s time to finish act one. Your character must initially come to grips with this thing that’s happened to them. In National Treasure, Ben Gates

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Writing