Monthly Archives: August 2015

Commas: Introductory Clauses

A comma is used after an introductory clause or phrase. So first, you’ll need to know the difference between clauses and phrases. If you don’t know, don’t worry–it’s actually quite easy. A clause has a subject and a verb (predicate),

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The Oxford Comma–The Superhero of Punctuation

Today we’re going to talk about the easiest way to use commas–in a list. In a rational world, this would be a short post indeed. But vile punctuators have actually advocated leaving out (gasp!) the Oxford comma. I’m here to

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Commas and Independent Clauses

It’s time for more fascinating punctuation. That subtle little comma is possibly the most misused punctuation mark in the English language. That’s really saying something, since English also has apostrophes. This post will focus on independent clauses, which deserve a short review

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Author Interview with Erik Therme

What’s the craziest story idea you’ve ever had? And did you write it? At one point I toyed with the idea of writing a book about a donut shop robbery, told from multiple people’s perspectives. I have no idea how

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Weasel Words, Filters, and Other Candidates For Cutting

I used to overwrite in insane amounts. Unfortunately, I wrote seven novels before I discovered this, and now I’m working my way through, cutting them all down to size. So in honor of cutting my fourth novel by a third,

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Apostrophes–End the Abuse!

Perhaps it’s just that misery loves company. But I’m going to share some basic apostrophe rules anyway. 🙂 Apostrophes are most commonly used in contractions.  I am becomes I’m: I’m running as fast as I can. They are becomes they’re:

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How to Use Semicolons

I’ll pick up the challenge. This is how to use semicolons if you’re not typing an emoticon. First, you need to understand independent clauses. An independent clause is a complete sentence–subject, verb, (and most often) object. Simple independent clauses are

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