Blog Archives

Using a Comma for Contrast or Effect

Purdue says, “Use a comma near the end of a sentence to separate contrasted coordinate elements…” https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/owlprint/607/. Like so many definitions, this one needs some explanation for it to actually make sense. As covered in More than One Adjective–Comma or

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Commas and Parenthetical Statements

It’s time for another fascinating episode concerning the slippery little comma. There’s a good reason it’s the most misused punctuation in the English language. The rules are many and varied. Purdue says: “Use a pair of commas in the middle

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More Than One Adjective–Comma or No Comma?

We’ve all done it. The only place your characters can take refuge is in a spooky old house. Or is it a spooky, old house? Dang, what was that rule again? Fear not. I’m here to explain it for you.

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Commas: Introductory Clauses

A comma is used after an introductory clause or phrase. So first, you’ll need to know the difference between clauses and phrases. If you don’t know, don’t worry–it’s actually quite easy. A clause has a subject and a verb (predicate),

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Commas and Independent Clauses

It’s time for more fascinating punctuation. That subtle little comma is possibly the most misused punctuation mark in the English language. That’s really saying something, since¬†English also has¬†apostrophes. This post will focus on independent clauses, which deserve a short review

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